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Middle Eastern Dancewear

Please note: The items pictured on this page are examples of past work and are not themselves for sale. If you find one of these designs to be of interest, please contact Laurie to discuss creating one tailored to your needs.


Printed challis dresses with short bell sleeves and full circle skirts with a double row of ruffles on both sleeves and skirts. Bodices are princess seamed and fitted, with zippers up the back. Ruffles are silk twill (pink-purple bottom layer on all dresses) and various other drapey fabrics (all other ruffles). Hip wraps and jewelry by the individual dancers. These dresses were worn by Jawaahir Dance Company in their August 2002 production of "Khusuf al Qamar". (Original production included three dresses of each color.)


Chiton-like tunics and Indian salwar (pants) in various colors. Several different fabrics ranging from sueded challis to heavy polyester crepe. Tunics are slit to hip for mobility and are caught at the shoulder and bottom of the "sleeve" with antique looking metal buttons. The salwar have contrasting cuffs of purple-shot gold lamé. Veils and tassels belts from company stock costuming. These costumes were worn by Jawaahir Dance Company in their February 2002 production of "Dancing to Byzantium".


Printed floral challis dresses of Saidi (Upper Egyptian) style. Princess seamed bodices (semi-fitted) with bell sleeves and attached A-line skirts slit to just above the knee. Applied bias trim in various coordinating colors. Zippered in the back. Headdresses of black cotton velour and black organza with bias trim to match the dress. (Note: the beadwork on the headdresses was done by the company members.) These dresses were worn by Jawaahir Dance Company in their July, 2000, production of "Dreams".

(Fringed dresses worn by the candelabra dancers by Madame Abla of Cairo, Egypt.)

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